racial-profiling
Jamahl Kersey May 26, 2016 No Comments

Though some people choose to not focus on the negative aspects of society, it is impossible to deny their existence. Racial profiling, for example, is a problem experienced each day in the United States. Efforts have been made in an attempt to abolish the morally wrong action, but unfortunately, not many consequences exist for those who racially profile. In 2014, the Obama Administration attempted to restrain the racial profiling so heavily seen in the country, but there is only so much litigation that the justice system can bring against offenders. There are two sides to every story, but an unfavorable party tends to walk away as a result of lack of evidence, witnesses, and the whole he said, she said argument. Racial profiling is a common offense experienced in a multitude of situations. The most common are as followed:

Shopping

It is widely known that retailers in America profile African-Americans, Hispanics, and those of Middle Eastern decent far more than they do Caucasian shoppers. Whether it is Wal-Mart, Target, or the upscale boutiques on Rodeo Drive, a person of color is likely to be followed, stopped, and perhaps even accused of stealing. The general hospitality a store is supposed to give to their shoppers is rarely experienced by minorities. To make matters worse, retailers often admit that they racially profile, but attempt to justify it with statistics that do not even exist.

Traffic Stops

Black drivers are twice as likely to be arrested during a traffic stop than white drivers. Native Americans and those of Middle Eastern descent are the most likely to be stopped during traffic hour. While the Attorney General has attempted to educate officers across the nation that this profiling is unethical, wrong, and unacceptable, it still happens each day.

Investigations

Being at the wrong place at the wrong time is an unfortunate part of life. If you are at a party, for example, and the cops have evidence allowing them to obtain a search warrant under the suspicion of illegal activity taking place at the residence, an innocent white person will be simply patted down. A person of color, however, is likely to be intensively searched and then hauled in for further questioning despite them being innocent.

A Day at the Park

Unfortunately, racial profiling extends to children. Stories have surfaced of black children being arrested and, when asked why, a simple explanation that they fit the description of a criminal is given. Ava Greenwell discusses her nightmare that resulted in the wrongful arrest of her thirteen-year-old African-American son who was riding his bike wearing the wrong outfit that day, apparently. The grounds for arrest? His cargo shorts fit a description of a burglar in the area.

Who Gets Hired?

Have you ever been curious as to why job applications ask for your race? Granted, you understand that they need a background check to discover your criminal history, but the race card seems a little redundant. A white male with a record is far more likely to be hired for a job than a black male with no criminal history. To make matter worse, employers are beginning to assume your race just by reading your name.

Yolanda Spivey is a black woman with an extensive and impressive educational background. Upon trying to find a job, Yolanda realized that she was unable to find employment despite her education and experience. As her suspicions arose, she kept the same education and work history on her application, but changed her name to Bianca White. She applied to the same jobs that rejected her, and to her surprise, she got called in for interviews. There is no denying that certain employers racially profile with these examples.

To conclude, not all retailers, police officers, or employers are racist. Very few of them actually are, in fact. However, racial profiling statistics are far too high for a nation that is supposed to be so advanced and tolerant. Failure to live up to our title of being a tolerant nation will result in the regression of our very society.

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